News from around the world

Lions Are Facing A Grave Danger In Africa

Lions are facing a grave danger in Africa. Kenya, home to tens of thousands of lions in the past, is now down to its last two thousand. And even these might be lost in the next couple of decades. The danger here is chiefly conflict with humans. As population grows and people and their cattle compete directly with lions and their prey for resources, the predators increasingly come into conflict with people. In the end the lions lose out, getting speared, shot and of late.. poisoned. Furadan, or C...

The Sumatran Tiger

sumatran tiger

Tthe Sumatran tiger is the smallest of the tiger subspecies.  They are fighting for survival in the face of rapid habitat destruction and unchecked poaching alongside many other endangered species in the Southeast Asian islands. Recent reports have revealed an alarming surge in deforestation of their habitat.

When Wildlife Enthusiasts Think Of Africa’s Majestic Big Cats...

But the Asian felines are a hot commodity in South Africa, where the controversial predator breeding industry has been under scrutiny. Tigers can be found throughout South Africa’s “predator parks”, where tourists can “pay to play” and be photographed with cute tiger and lion cubs. And while there has been increasing focus on the lion bone trade emanating from South Africa’s game industry, its “legal” tiger trade seem to have gone largely unn...

Lion Bone Trade In Africa

Every year, hundreds of tourists pay about ,000 to be able to shoot lions in an enclosure. This is called canned hunting. With tigers on the brink of extinction, dead lion bones are increasingly used as a substitute in Asian markets as some believe they can cure illnesses. Some are now afraid lions are being bred just for their bones and that the appetite for lion bones will lead to them being poached in the wild, the same way endangered rhinos have been hunted. There is no scientific proo...

Leopards Mating In Sabi Sabi

A young female leopard is able to breed for the first time when she is about two years old. Male leopards are capable of mating about the same age as females, but they often have to face competition from older and stronger male leopards. As a result, young male leopards usually have their first chance of mating at three to four years old. A female leopard will be ready to breed again after her cubs have grown up and left. She gives birth about every two years. There is no particular breeding se...